If it Feels Good Do It (or not)

16 I say be guided by the Spirit and you won’t carry out your selfish desires. 17 A person’s selfish desires are set against the Spirit, and the Spirit is set against one’s selfish desires. They are opposed to each other, so you shouldn’t do whatever you want to do. 18 But if you are being led by the Spirit, you aren’t under the Law. 19 The actions that are produced by selfish motives are obvious, since they include sexual immorality, moral corruption, doing whatever feels good, 20 idolatry, drug use and casting spells, hate, fighting, obsession, losing your temper, competitive opposition, conflict, selfishness, group rivalry, 21 jealousy, drunkenness, partying, and other things like that. I warn you as I have already warned you, that those who do these kinds of things won’t inherit God’s kingdom (Galatians 5:16-21, Common English Bible).

It was a rallying cry of the 1960s and 1970s. Who that lived through that era did not hear the words, “If it feels good do it”?

A couple of weeks ago I preached a sermon where I talked about slang in general and used examples from each decade. Remember the 80s when “Bad” was good and the 90s when it was all about the bling. You don’t hear that much about “Bling” anymore. Such terms tend to come and go. Another example from the 1960s was “Keep On Truckin.'”

There are other words and phrases that seem to transcend time and generations. The word “cool,” meaning great is a good example. Another is, “If it feels good do it.” While you usually don’t hear some of the other words and phrases from the time like one of the biggest buzzwords of the 60s, “Groovy,” seems to all but have disappeared. The same can be said for, “Keep On Truckin’.”

And then, there is, “If it feels good do it.” That phrase was license to do pretty well anything you wanted. It is a phrase that has transcended the 60s. But then again, it has transcended the firs century.

Contrary to what children of the 60s might think, they did not coin the term. Paul uses it in our lesson today. The big difference between the two is, those in the 1960s used it as a license to carry out whatever they wanted to do. Paul, on the other hand, uses the phrase as a warning. Paul even gives us a short but inconclusive list, telling us exactly what he means. Paul warns against immoral sexual behavior, sexual motives, moral corruption, idolatry, drug use and casting spells, hate, fighting, obsession, losing your temper, competitive opposition, conflict, selfishness, group rivalry, jealousy, drunkenness, partying, and other things like that.Paul tells us it isn’t a comprehensive list.

There is nothing wrong with doing things that make us feel good. But that also means there is something more here to consider. We find that in verse 17. Paul writes, “A person’s selfish desires are set against the Spirit, and the Spirit is set against one’s selfish desires.” As I read that verse, it seems to me that the key is in, “our selfish desires.”

As I consider Paul’s words, I can’t help but think he means when we live in an attitude of, if it feels good do it, we are living for ourselves instead of living for God.

I have to ask, when we work out our selfish desires, are we living for God or are we living for ourselves.

If it feels good, do it, as long as you are doing it for God. With God, nothing will ever feel better than anything else. So, if it feels good, DO IT, just make sure you know who you do it for.

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

In Search of the Genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved

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