What in the Heck is a Gittith? (Psalm 8)

Psalm 8

For the music leader. According to the Gittith. A psalm of David.

8 Lord, our Lord, how majestic
    is your name throughout the earth!
    You made your glory higher than heaven!
From the mouths of nursing babies
    you have laid a strong foundation
    because of your foes,
    in order to stop vengeful enemies.
When I look up at your skies,
    at what your fingers made—
    the moon and the stars
    that you set firmly in place—
        what are human beings
            that you think about them;
        what are human beings
            that you pay attention to them?
You’ve made them only slightly less than divine,
    crowning them with glory and grandeur.
You’ve let them rule over your handiwork,
    putting everything under their feet—
        all sheep and all cattle,
        the wild animals too,
        the birds in the sky,
        the fish of the ocean,
        everything that travels the pathways of the sea.
Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name throughout the earth! (Psalm 8:1-9, Common English Bible.

From time to time, we encounter a word in the Bible and we don’t know its meaning. In reality, some of these words, we haven’t a clue as to what they might mean. When we encounter one of these words, it is my intention to pause and give you a background meaning I have found in my research of that word.

Today we encounter one of those words. The word Gittith is one of those words. It is believed to be either a musical stringed instrument or a certain style or genre of music.

Gittith can be found in three places in Scripture, Psalm 8, Psalm 81, and Psalm 84. In each case, Gittith is part of the instructions at the very beginning of each psalm.

The largest group of opinions states that word points to a stringed instrument. It easily could have been one that looks something like the picture at the top. I find that an interesting instrument. Much like an acoustic guitar, the body those sound holes are important. That box on the body of the instruments serves much like the body of a guitar. So the sound needs a place to come out of the body hence, the sound hole. I did find pictures of what some scholars to believe the instrument that did not have sound holes.

When someone strikes up a heavy metal song, Christian or not, they know the heavy metal sound. If a Gittith was a particular genre or styles, you likely would have known when the choir started singing the song.

These two opinions are not the only ones available. The word is often, as it is in the Common English Bible, left untranslated. Others translate it as we have already seen it, into a Hebrew word meaning “wine.” Another translation uses the Philistine city of Gath.

One final possibility says that Gittith might have been a popular song tune in the Hebrew world. Putting new lyrics to an old favorite is nothing new. I do that pretty regularly these days. I know others do that too. In the United Methodist Hymnal there is a hymn titled “The Gift of Love.” There is one other in the hymnal using that tune in they hymnal, “Where Love is Found.” The third is a pretty recent addition to songs going with that tune titled, “Hymn of Praise.” The fourth song is one I wrote. If you are interested, let me know.

We may never know what Gittith means this side of eternity. And I have a basic theory that when we get there we are going to be too busy with a gillion other things to even care. So who is right? Only God know.

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

Seeking the genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved
Permission is given for non-commercial purposes.

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Source: Bible Odysesey

So From the Showers We Flee

And we have reached Saturday once again. I am sending you another of my song lyrics or poems. I hope you enjoy it.

Several years ago, early in my ministry I was in a used book store and bought a book I have long sense forgotten. When I got home with the book I did what I usually do with books I buy, at least for a while, it went on the shelf. When my next trip came along, I pulled the book out to take with me. Sometime between the shelf and my briefcase a piece of paper fell out. I picked it up and it was a newspaper clipping. It had about 10 hymn quotes, but they weren’t too much about the lyrics. I have no idea where the book went. I probably gave it away to another new preacher starting out. I have even less of an idea what happened to the newspaper clipping. I guess it got lost in one of my moves in the past.

Anyway, not wanting to forget any more than I already have, I decided to write some song lyrics for the hymn lines I can remember. These are intended to be funny but also get a little more serious at the end. I hope you enjoy.

In honor of all the rain we have had in East Texas in the recent past (when I walk the dog I sink in the mud), “We sing, ‘There Shall be Showers of Blessing’ and then won’t go to church in the rain.” Obviously, the tune for this song is, “There Shall Be Showers of Blessing.”

[Verse 1]
There shall be showers of blessing
From God a promise we gain,
We hear the blessings on roof-tops
It sounds a whole lot like rain;

[Chorus 1]
Showers of blessing,
Blessings God knows that we need
We think we’ll melt just like sugar,.
So, from the showers we flee.

[Verse 2]
There shall be showers of blessing,
Today rain will keep me in bed.
More sleep I’ll find it relaxing,
Skip church, read a novel instead…

[Chorus 1]

[Verse 3]
There shall be showers of blessing,
Raincoats may keep our clothes dry.
Wet is my head as the rain falls,
Lost that umbrella of mine…

[Chorus 1]

[Verse 4]
There shall be showers of blessing,
I pray the waters soon peak.
Blessings on blessings around me,
Rain hasn’t stopped here all week…

[Chorus 1]

[Verse 5]
There shall be showers of blessing,
The dog tries to shake his fur dry.
He raised his head to the heavens,
Barks at the rain in the sky…

[Chorus 1]

[Verse 6]
There shall be showers of blessing,
Today I stayed home on a lark.
Blessings are gone its just water,
I think I will build me an ark…

[Chorus 1]

[Verse 7]
There shall be showers of blessing,
Thunder won’t run me away.
We need some rain for a harvest.
Thank God I’m in Church today…

[Chorus 2]
Showers of blessing,
Rain will not keep us away.
We will not melt we’re not sugar.
Through showers we’ll worship today.

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

In Search of the genuine,
Keith

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A Shiggaion (Psalm 7)

Psalm 7

A shiggaion of David, which he sang to the Lord about Cush, a Benjaminite.

7 I take refuge in you, Lord, my God.
Save me from all who chase me!
Rescue me!
Otherwise, they will rip me apart,
dragging me off with no chance of rescue.
Lord, my God, if I have done this—
if my hands have done anything wrong,
if I have repaid a friend with evil
or oppressed a foe for no reason—
then let my enemy
not only chase but catch me,
trampling my life into the ground,
laying my reputation in the dirt. Selah
Get up, Lord; get angry!
Stand up against the fury of my foes!
Wake up, my God;
you command that justice be done!
Let the assembled peoples surround you.
Rule them from on high!

The Lord will judge the peoples.
Establish justice for me, Lord,
according to my righteousness
and according to my integrity.
Please let the evil of the wicked be over,
but set the righteous firmly in place
because you, the righteous God,
are the one who examines hearts and minds.

God is my shield;
he saves those whose heart is right.
God is a righteous judge,
a God who is angry at evil[d] every single day.
If someone doesn’t change their ways,
God will sharpen his sword,
will bend his bow,
will string an arrow.
God has deadly weapons in store
for those who won’t change;
he gets his flaming arrows ready!

But look how the wicked hatch evil,
conceive trouble, give birth to lies!
They make a pit, dig it all out,
and then fall right into the hole that they’ve made!
The trouble they caus
will come back on their own heads
the violence they commit
will come down on their own skulls.
But I will thank the Lord
for his righteousness;
I will sing praises
to the name of the Lord Most High (Psalm 7:1-17)

One day last school year, I had finished the lesson in government class for that day. I gave the students an assignment. I went to my desk to do some other work. I don’t remember what I was doing but lesson plans or grading papers would be a good assumption.

Tonya (not her real name) came to my desk and asked me, “What does bicameral mean?” I pointed to a corner of my desk. There was a dictionary laying there so I said, “Get the dictionary and look it up.”

“Dr. B. please just tell me,” she asked.

“No, Tonya,” I replied. “You need to learn how to do these things yourself.

“I don’t want to know that bad,” she said. She then started going back to her seat.

“No Tonya. Come back and look it up,” I told her. She then did a stereotypical pout and stomp back to my desk and jerked the book up and started looking the word up. “You can get an attitude if you want, but you are going to learn the meaning of that work and if you find it, especially now, you will always remember it.”

She goes through the dictionary. She is in the right general place. She frustrated and then looks back at me and says, “Bi-camel isn’t in this dictionary.” She has a huge smile on her face. She thought she had gotten the best of me.

“Tonya, the word is bicameral, not by bi-camel. You need to look up the correct word.”

She finally found it. I asked her what it meant. “Two houses,” she replied.

“And what does that have to do with government? I asked her. I

“I don’t know.”

Then I made her pull one of the government text books from the shelf and look it up in that book. There she learned it meant a two house legislative body.

I can’t say that Tonya would remember what the term means today but I do know that she remembered it for her next test and more importantly, she remembered for the final exam.

So, what does Shiggaion mean? I wish I could tell you. I didn’t really expect that Mr. Webster would be able to tell me, but I had a dictionary handy so I looked it up. This time, Tonya would have been right. It wasn’t in there.

Still, I didn’t find it particularly surprising when it wasn’t there. It is a Hebrew word, not in English. I was thinking this might be cone of those times when it is difficult to translate a work because we have no English word that actually mean the same thing. So, there is no way to perfectly translate it.

I went on to my one volume Bible dictionary to a multi-volume Bible dictionary and, while I found the word, I also found that there is no clear consensus to the word’s meaning.

Some scholars believe it to be some kind of prayer service. Something with prayer was most common. Others believe it to be some kind of worship. One person even said, it was a multi-headed monster sent by God to attack David. Another agreed with the monster theory but God wasn’t sending the monster after David, God was sending the monster after Cush, a man from the tribe of Benjamin, also mentioned in that heading.

I would agree with those who believed Shiggaion to be some kind of act of worship. I base that on a little logic. The psalm itself is an act of worship. The heading says, “A Shiggaion of David…” These headings are an instruction to the meaning of the psalm itself or instructions to the leader. The word is obviously a form of explanation of the psalm.

It does seem clear to me, that there will always be things we don’t understand. We do our best to research and find an answer but we also need to be honest with ourselves. We will never know all the meanings or everything we read or encounter, so I believe we do the best we can, then we move on. There is little else we can do. Some things are not meant for we finite humans to know and understand. I believe this might be one.

By the way, the meaning of the word, is not clear. This word is mentioned one time in all the Bible, right here. What scholars believed to be the plural of the word gets a mention in Habakkuk 3:4, “shigionoth.” And, what does Habakkuk 3:4 say?

I hope you have had a blessed day in the Lord.

Seeking the Genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved
Permission is granted for this posts use for non-commercial purposes.

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The Girl with Pretty Red Hair

Cindy with Jenna on the day I baptized Jenna

To the extent I have them, I thought I would use Saturdays to post the song lyrics I write. I actually started last week with “Hello Little Girl” that I wrote for that sweet new granddaughter Cindy and I have. By the way, since I have added music to it, there have been some changes in those lyrics since I finished them a week ago.

I have worked on songs for Jenna and Natalie this past week. I will post them at some point in the future as they are not yet finished.

Today’s song is one I wrote almost three years ago for the anniversary of Cindy putting up with me for 40 years. I don’t think I posted it back then but even if I did, when I pulled out out in the last couple of weeks to submit to a site where I can have it dated and a bit better protected, I had forgotten a good bit of it. Plus, with Valentine’s Day coming, I thought I should blow the dust off it. This is one of the few songs I have that both the lyrics and the music (not shown here) are both original.

The picture is of Cindy with our oldest granddaughter Jenna, when Jenna was the only granddaughter. The title of the song is, “The Girl with Pretty Red Hair,” and I guess the title at least fits Jenna too. Morgan’s latest post about Sydney indicates that Sydney just may be a girl with pretty red hair too. Natalie doesn’t have red hair but it is still pretty and so is she. Hey, I am Gramps, what do you expect me to say? Besides that, I’m right!!!

The Girl with Pretty Red Hair

I first saw you, we never spoke.
The girl had class, I was a joke.
I didn’t see, I didn’t care,
About the girl, with pretty red hair.

Opened my eyes, took a fresh look,
I saw you there, with opened book,
Saw what I’d missed, I Saw your flair,
Flair from the girl, with pretty red hair.

Back then most folks, gave us no chance,
But with each year, our love enhanced,
We’ve had great fun, and love we share,
Me and the girl, with pretty red hair.

I look at you, Lord I can see,
Each day you give, your love to me,
Today with me, we’re quite the pair,
Me and the girl, with pretty red hair,

I do look back, I look ahead,
Approaching days, I have no dread,
You touched my heart, blessings we share,
Me and the girl, with pretty red hair.

Me and the girl, with pretty red hair.

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

Seeking the Genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights, Reserved

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We Are the Music (Psalm 6)

We Are the Music (Psalm 6)

Psalm 6

For the music leader. On stringed instruments. According to the eighth. A psalm of David.

6 Please, Lord,
    don’t punish me when you are angry;
    don’t discipline me when you are furious.
Have mercy on me, Lord,
    because I’m frail.
Heal me, Lord,
    because my bones are shaking in terror!
My whole body is completely terrified!
        But you, Lord! How long will this last?
Come back to me, Lord! Deliver me!
    Save me for the sake of your faithful love!
No one is going to praise you
    when they are dead.
Who gives you thanks
    from the grave?

I’m worn out from groaning.
    Every night, I drench my bed with tears;
    I soak my couch all the way through.
My vision fails because of my grief;
    it’s weak because of all my distress.
Get away from me, all you evildoers,
    because the Lord has heard me crying!
The Lord has listened to my request.
    The Lord accepts my prayer.
10 All my enemies will be ashamed
    and completely terrified;
    they will be defeated
    and ashamed instantly (Psalm 6:1-10, Common English Bible)

Earlier I was looking at a piece of music the Lufkin Community Band will play at their “Spring Spectacular” concert in April. Cindy and I both play in the band. Cindy plays the flute and I make noise as a percussion player. The title of the music piece is “Television Milestones.”

I was looking specifically above the first staff, looking there you will see things like “Allegro,” Andante,” Brightly,” and several others. Those words have something to do the tempo, the speed of the music. Allegro means fast, lively, cheerful, and joyful. A music note, usually a quarter note follows that term and then a number follows that say, 120. That 120 is the number of beats per minute the song should follow. You might see things like rit, that means retard or slow down. It is a part of tempo as well.

There are other symbols besides the notes themselves. You can see them often and are throughout the piece. You might see things like p or f. These are called dynamics and has something to do with how soft or how loud the band should play. The p means piano and it has nothing to do with an actual piano. It means soft. The f means forte and it is loud. Both of these can be a singe letter like p or they can be in several letters, up to 4, ffff. The symbol from math for greater than or less than, ><, these mean to gradually get softer or louder. Dynamics add power and meaning to the music.

One other thing the piece of music says above the staff is the instrument that the composer wants to play that particular part. As I type I have the music for “Salute to Television” sitting in my lap right now. In the top left corner it says, “MALLET PERCUSSION (Xylophone).” The composer doesn’t want Cindy to play this part on her flute. Instead, ignoring the far more talented, the composer wants someone like me to make noise that means nothing to the music. Well, that is what I did at rehearsal earlier this week.

Much like the music of today, the music of old has instructions on how the song should be played. These instructions, considered by many Biblical scholars are usually considered to be a later addition to the text. I am talking specifically about the writing (in bold at the top) that says, “For the music leader. On stringed instruments. According to the eighth. A psalm of David.” This psalm has instructions telling the conductor or music leader how the psalmist, in this case David, wants the music played. The composer today is usually listed on the music as well.

The instructions say to play the piece on stringed instruments. This was probably a harp and/or lyre, an early guitar or something that resembled a ukulele. There are other possibilities as well. For those who think guitars in worship are a relatively new thing, they are not. Stringed instruments were the most common and things. The piano and organ didn’t come into existence until between 1698-1700, and the 3rd century BC respectively.

So, some kind of eight stringed instrument was to be the primary instrument. That is backed up with the term, “According to the Eighth. Some scholars believe that to be a reinforcement of the eight stringed instrument. Others think it is some kind of musical instruction and the purpose disappeared with time.

This particular psalm does not have the instruction seen in the text of many psalms. The word Selah is seen often throughout the entire book. The general consensus is that Selah’s meaning is lost in time.

So, what is the purpose of all this? We are God’s music. And, just as there are many genres of music, some of us might sound more country, or rock-n-roll, Gospel, or Big Band. Maybe you are more classical or even something a bit different like say, Gregorian chants. Whatever our genre may be (please note, I said genre, not songs. There is music out there leaving no doubt it does not come from God) God gave us all a song to sing. God placed a melody in our hearts. I don’t mean that literally but to put it in a more literal way, perhaps your song is cooking or church maintenance. Maybe you have a heart to visit people in the hospital or prepare gifts for the military far from home. Whatever it is, the song is yours. Exactly how you sing it, is up to you.

We are God’s piece of music and the instructions are written in the Bible. Unlike the piece of music, which is not capable of conducting as well, God gives us the instruction and then we are to go out and follow them. When God brings us all together and we follow those instructions, we produce a beautiful song of our lives to share with each other and with the world

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

In search of the genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved

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Accepted Prayer (Psalm 6)

Psalm 6

For the music leader. On stringed instruments. According to the eighth. A psalm of David.

6 Please, Lord,
    don’t punish me when you are angry;
    don’t discipline me when you are furious.
Have mercy on me, Lord,
    because I’m frail.
Heal me, Lord,
    because my bones are shaking in terror!
My whole body is completely terrified!
        But you, Lord! How long will this last?
Come back to me, Lord! Deliver me!
    Save me for the sake of your faithful love!
No one is going to praise you
    when they are dead.
Who gives you thanks
    from the grave?

I’m worn out from groaning.
    Every night, I drench my bed with tears;
    I soak my couch all the way through.
My vision fails because of my grief;
    it’s weak because of all my distress.
Get away from me, all you evildoers,
    because the Lord has heard me crying!
The Lord has listened to my request.
    The Lord accepts my prayer.
10 All my enemies will be ashamed
    and completely terrified;
    they will be defeated
    and ashamed instantly (Psalm 6:1-10, Common English Bible)

Though it isn’t possible for them to know, I always find it interesting to see a a story or in this case a psalm that reminds us something in the New Testament, even when there is on obvious connection. When I read Psalm 6, I am reminded of the story of the Pharisee and the Tax collector.

Perhaps you remember the story. If not, let me share it with you direct from Luke’s Gospel.

Jesus told this parable to certain people who had convinced themselves that they were righteous and who looked on everyone else with disgust: 10 “Two people went up to the temple to pray. One was a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. 11 The Pharisee stood and prayed about himself with these words, ‘God, I thank you that I’m not like everyone else—crooks, evildoers, adulterers—or even like this tax collector. 12 I fast twice a week. I give a tenth of everything I receive.’ 13 But the tax collector stood at a distance. He wouldn’t even lift his eyes to look toward heaven. Rather, he struck his chest and said, ‘God, show mercy to me, a sinner.’ 14 I tell you, this person went down to his home justified rather than the Pharisee. All who lift themselves up will be brought low, and those who make themselves low will be lifted up” (Luke 18:9-14, Common English Bible).

In the beginning Psalm 6, the psalmist says, in essence, I am a sinful man and I seek forgiveness from God though I know I deserve God’s wrath. In the second half of the psalm he gives a vivid description of his repentance. He sounds much like the repentant tax collector Luke talks about. He could easily be the tax collector to whom the Pharisee points.

I can’t say that I have known anyone who thinks they are better in God’s eyes than anyone else, as Luke describes the Pharisee in that story. As I imagine the psalmist praying, those chasing him, persecuting him, to use today’s vernacular, bullying him, stop. He seems to want it stopped even at the use of Divine intervention.

Have I known people who think they are better than the rest of us? Absolutely. Here is the difference I see between them and the Pharisee. Those I know either think they are better than God, they think there is no God, or they just don’t pray. Such was not the case with the Pharisee.

I have known people like the psalmist and the tax collector. I have known people who cry out to God for forgiveness and yet also believe in their heart of hearts that the are useless and there is no way God would possibly forgive them. That heartfelt belief is completely wrong. Just look at all those Jesus forgave. It seems clear to me that if Jesus was to forgive the various people in the Bible the Pharisees called, “Sinners,” Jesus will forgive us.

What is required in the days of the psalmist, the days of the Pharisee and the tax collector is faith. When I see the psalmist, pursued and tired of the pursuit prays to God. Both the Pharisee and the tax collector are praying but the Pharisee’s prayer is about his greatness. The tax collector’s prayer is seeking God to do something that humbles him, repenting and asking forgiveness.

We have the same choice. We can pray and sing our own praises or we can humble ourselves before God, admit that we aren’t quite as great as we want to think and seek forgiveness. Acceptable prayer begins with a heart that is contrite and humble. The psalmist and the tax collector show us how it’s done.

Have a great day in the Lord.

In search of the genuine,
Keith

Copyright 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved.

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God Will Take Care of You (Psalm 4)

As we read Psalm 4, it seems clear to me, the psalmist, in this case David, had no question, God was in charge and that God would take care of him. Read for yourself:

Answer me when I cry out, my righteous God!
    Set me free from my troubles!
        Have mercy on me!
        Listen to my prayer!

How long, you people,
    will my reputation be insulted?
How long will you continue
    to love what is worthless
    and go after lies? Selah
Know this: the Lord takes
    personal care of the faithful.
The Lord will hear me
    when I cry out to him.
So be afraid, and don’t sin!
    Think hard about it in your bed
    and weep over it! Selah
Bring righteous offerings,
    and trust the Lord!

Many people say,
    “We can’t find goodness anywhere.
    The light of your face has left us, Lord!”
But you have filled my heart with more joy
    than when their wheat and wine are everywhere!
I will lie down and fall asleep in peace
    because you alone, Lord, let me live in safety.
(Psalm 4:1-8, Common English Bible).

While I was in seminary, a Bible study activity used in my Christian education classes came from the book Teaching the Bible to Adults and Youth by the late Dr. Dick Murray. It was one of the simplest study tools in concept. It was actually pretty difficult in practice. I have used it often since. I find it to be difficult but also insightful and worthwhile.

When I started working on today’s post, I thought Psalm 4 might be a good place for this exercise. Below is the paraphrase version of the psalm I wrote.

My God,
I pray that you will hear my prayer,
Have mercy on me Lord.
I am troubled and cry out to you.
You alone are fully honorable and ethical.
I know you will hear me when I pray.

Why do people around me tarnish my reputation?
How long, will it continue?
How long will people continue to live what God hates?
How long will they witness falsely against me? Against God?

I know I am faithful. I know I praise God.
Because of my faithfulness, God will hear me.
God will hear me when I pray.
When I pray, God hears my vice.
God hears me when I cry out.

Those who sin against God,
Those who are not righteous or honor God,
So be afraid, you friend, be afraid of God’s wrath.
Think hard about your sin when you lay in bed at night.
Cry out. Cry out loudly for God’s grace.

Quit questioning God.
Your questions are the opposite of righteousness and trust.
Bring to God your offerings of praise and trust in the Lord.

Why do so many question God’s faithfulness?
Why do you think you cannot find goodness in the world?
Perhaps there is no goodness because sin has caused God to leave.

But you God give me joy. You fill my heart with good things.
You fill me with good food that is abundant.
You quench my thirst with your best wine.

You alone are God. You have power in the world.
You give me your assurance. You give me relief.
Because of you, I am safe.
Because of you, I lie down and sleep in peace.
(Psalm 4, paraphrase, jkb)

As a part of your study, I would challenge you to sit down and write your own paraphrase of Psalm 4. Really, the exercise would expect two things. First, you are putting the psalm in your own words. Second, what is God saying to you in this psalm.

For me, through this psalm, God is emphasizing that safety, peace, and the needs of life come from God. In other words, God will take care of you.

Most of you know already, the psalms were the hymnal of the ancient Israelites. It is a song book.

The problem for us is, for the most part, we don’t know how to put the psalms to music. It makes me think of one additional exercise for you today, and this one is pretty simple. When I read Psalm 4, I immediately paired it with the hymn, “God Will Take Care of You.” Your challenge, “if you choose to accept it,” and I hope you will, identify for yourself, what hymn you can pair with Psalm 4.

God Will Take Care of You

Be not dismayed whate’er betide,
God will take care of you;
Beneath His wings of love abide,
God will take care of you.

God will take care of you,
Through every day, o’er all the way;
He will take care of you,
God will take care of you.

Through days of toil when heart doth fail,
God will take care of you;
When dangers fierce your path assail,
God will take care of you.

God will take care of you,
Through every day, o’er all the way;
He will take care of you,
God will take care of you.

All you may need He will provide,
God will take care of you;
Nothing you ask will be denied,
God will take care of you.

God will take care of you,
Through every day, o’er all the way;
He will take care of you,
God will take care of you.

No matter what may be the test,
God will take care of you;
Lean, weary one, upon His breast,
God will take care of you.

God will take care of you,
Through every day, o’er all the way;
He will take care of you,
God will take care of you.

God will take care of you and me. God is around us everywhere. What remains for you and I is to follow in faithfulness.

Have a blessed day in the Lord.

Seeking the Genuine,
Keith

Copyright, 2020, J. Keith Broyles, All Rights Reserved

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